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liberia

Easy Inspired Romance for Valentine's Day

FAM, self By January 30, 2014 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , 2 Comments

Easy Romance for Valentine's Day The continent of Africa has helped me fall more deeply in love this year and I couldn’t possibly set up a romantic Valentine’s dinner without giving a nod to its guttural beauty and spirit.  In February I worked with kids in Liberia with Right To Play Canada and then my husband raised money in August for Canada’s first blood cord bank by summiting Kilimanjaro in Tanzania. Throughout the year, our kids’ school fundraised to build water wells in South Sudan. Whish Romantic Table

Typically I am a high-maintenance silver, china and crystal girl. Don’t snicker. But after the 2 trips to Africa, kids’ activities and work, I am rather exhausted.  When my Whish Romance Box arrived I had just attended the kids’ first school musical all about water. The performance talked of the importance of water and Africa was a large component. The boys explained that many families in Sudan are leaving their homes and the wells the school has built because there is a war going on. Wow. Africa deserves a nod, and I am so thankful for how it has touched all of our lives this year. Whish Box

Opening the Whish romance box I was thrilled. They had thought of everything – even menus and a shopping list! Turnkey. Heavy silver plates, cutlery, stunning champagne flutes and wine glasses – all in plastic for easy recycling or re-use. (Hello beach picnic). Chocolates, a pashmina, napkins, vase and tealight holders (with the candles that I always run out of!). In fact, Whish made romance so easy with the essentials that I could focus on the theme and the romance of it all.

So how do you add thoughtful romance? Incorporate bits from your life. It needn’t be as exotic as Africa, but little touches – that this time-saving box of fun gives you – can be tacked on at the end. But if you don’t have an iota of creative juice in your body – you are covered.  Follow the step by step directions, make the (fab) suggested meal and ask the florist for the suggested flowers. The evening will be epic – as my 6 year-old likes to say. But I’m hoping he is referring to something different. IN THE WHISH BOX

I draped a gold and blue cloth I had been given in Liberia over the table in our bedroom. The boys’ two hand carved wooden giraffes kissed at the back of our plates. White flowers and a few stones from the Kilimanjaro climb along with the heart-shaped chocolates strewn on the table finished the look. African drum music was next. We had a beautiful dinner, conversation with depth and given that this is rated G, I think I’ll stop there. Wink.

** GIVEAWAY: Who wouldn’t want a Valentines Day box, extra candles and a Breakfast Basket ? We know you don’t want to cook on the morning after. The contest will run from January 27th to February 3rd. The product will be delivered to the winner in time for Valentines Day.

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Disclosure: This is a sponsored post courtesy of Whish.ca. All ideas and opinions are our own.

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The Field that was Leveled Through Hope

fitness, GEAR, International, ROAM By March 21, 2013 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , 8 Comments

Hope Right To PlayIt has been several days since my return from Liberia and I feel as if I am missing a big part of myself.  The kids’ faces and gentle touches to my hands are constantly in my thoughts, and the friendships formed with the local Right To Play volunteers and staff are ones I will cherish forever.  Conversations with Olympians Clara Hughes and Rosie MacLennan motivated me to become a better human being, and experiencing so much poverty with fellow parent Lori Harasem made me play even harder to generate smiles from the kids.

Ben Right To PlayThe adults and teenagers we met had experienced terrible things in their lifetimes with a war that ended very recently.  Some had lost parents and raised themselves.  Most had a loved one who experienced sexual assault.  And every adult associated with Right To Play worked tirelessly to restore hope for the next generation.  Housing Bridge LiberiaEvery day the same volunteers (many had no employment themselves but chose to devote their days to teaching children through Right To Play activities) emerged into an empty space and performed magic.  It was like a slow motion film.  The waiting children would all turn, smile and organize themselves into a ‘great big circle’ so they could begin.  The rhythms of their responses to the leader of the game formed a percussive music.  The empty, litter-filled space had become vibrant and full of life.

Liberia Soccer GameLooking back on the experience, there is one thing that resonates: hope.  Despite dire circumstances in every community we visited, the smiles, cooperation and respect for one another was extraordinary.  I was brought back to the basics of life:  drink fresh water, keep your clothes and environment clean to prevent disease, help your neighbour.  Homemade ToyA young boy bathed meticulously in a large bucket by the side of the road.  A woman carrying a huge bundle on her head picked over potato leaves in a market to find the best choices for her family.  A twenty year-old on a motorbike saw the Right To Play sign on our van and gave me a huge thumbs-up.  It was all about hope.

Women in LiberiaThe new department of women and family in Liberia has made women’s rights a priority and there are billboards against the abuse of women and talking about seeking immediate medical help if you are assaulted.  Those were jarring to see.  But one sign on the side of the road resonated.  This one advertisement was a definition of ‘Mother’: a person who ‘makes something out of nothing’.  That is exactly what I witnessed.  These women generated a meager income buying bleach in bulk and selling it in small bags, buying a case of water packets and a block of ice and hoping for extreme heat so they may sell a few individual bags of water to quench thirst in their community.

Right to Play West Point OlympiansRight To Play has never taken a parent ambassador to a field visit and it was a profound experience.  I felt like an Olympian with the amount of interest directed toward me!  But I was clearly not nearly as disciplined or accomplished – I wasn’t great at playing the soccer games (I fell flat on my face in front of 300 kids and sprained my hand).  As a parent, I felt a powerful connection to the children and parents. Right To Play has everything covered for the children who are able to participate.  Baby Wearing AfricaBut the kids whose parents don’t prioritize play are missing out.  Many parents keep their children out of school to assist with washing or to take a long walk to wells for water.  I felt that not only could I connect with the kids as a parent, but talking to the parents was so important.  Their eyes would light up when I talked of my kids or asked for instruction on making a baby wrap out of a piece of towel.

Clara Hughes Playing with KidsAs a mother and publisher, I can make a promise.  I will never stop supporting the incredible work done by Right To Play. My kids are now playing the games and I intend to do everything  in my power to support the organization because it spreads hope.  And it is clear to me from meeting the people of Liberia that hope is all one needs.

To donate to Right To Play in Liberia, please click here.  No amount is too small.  Every donation will be matched 3 times.  Thank you.

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Teaching Equality

charity, FAM, health By March 8, 2013 Tags: , , , , No Comments

Olympians and KidsThe smells of burnt fish and feces are becoming normal.  The soles of my feet, after three days, can no longer get clean.  There is no pavement – just sand where the kids play their games.  It makes it easy for the Right to Play leaders to draw lines to facilitate the games and learning.

Different schools and areas are on a sliding scale of poverty.  The little girl who defecated on the wall of her corrugated metal shack this morning.  The woman wearing only her bra and a sarong around her waist who wanted my phone number in Canada – versus the school that had a well and children without sores on their faces or distended bellies.

LIberia JumpWe played with kids at Islamic schools, Christian schools and who knows what kind of schools.  It didn’t matter at all.  The kids reacted the same.  And the group leaders need to seriously come to my house in order to get my kids in line.  All they have to do is say ‘Circle’ (pronounced ‘’psy-cow’ in West African dialect) and the kids magically form a circle, joining hands.  A huge part of the process is response.  The leader says ‘circle’ and kids say ‘circle’  the leader says ‘circle wider’ and everyone jumps backwards as they chant ‘wider’.  The rhythm and music that is part of many of the games was compelling.

After three days it is hard to be stoic.  A little girl today followed me everywhere and the attention I paid her may be more than she has gotten in weeks.  Yesterday children of Clara Town flocked around us and followed like geese.  They all want to be in photos, and seeing the shot afterwards on the digital display thrills them to no end.  They make crazy poses – perhaps thinking they are rock stars and models (one man of about 21 begged me for his photo and posed like Beckham).  Sometimes the camera equipment scares them.  I made two little ones cry today and could have died.  It was like I had zapped them with a tazer.  They have much to cry about and my Nikon was the thing that did it.  I have never felt so horrible.  You absolutely liberia water wellmust ask prior to photographing adults.  Many in more impoverished areas feel like the rich North Americans with their expensive equipment are coming to take pictures for profit out of their hardship.  We got a few scowls, but mostly warmth.  The women are so beautiful.  I could photograph them endlessly.

I had the opportunity to work with many older kids – 10 to 14 and the games were more advanced.  In one, 4 areas were designated as ‘agree’ ‘disagree’ ‘I don’t know’ and ‘maybe’.  The leader would pose a question and we would run to the quadrant that best fit our thoughts.  We then had to justify why we ran there.  In one instance, the statement was ‘Only girls should play with dolls’.  Half of us (including me and the Olympians) ran to ‘Disagree’ and half of the girls ran to ‘Agree’.  A heated debate ensued.  In Liberian culture only women care for children, therefore only girls should play with dolls.  The girls in our quarter countered that if a man has a baby he needs to know liberia playdayhow to hold it.  The facilitator stood between and reminded us often that we could move if we changed our minds.  Clara Hughes piped up and said that at one time some people thought that only men could to do sports but now both sexes excel.  My non-confrontational self was uncomfortable.  And shocked at the cultural disparity.  But amazed that some of the girls were really thinking for themselves – on all sides of the argument.  They were certainly less nervous orators than me.  I kind of wished we could do a touchy/feely hugging game afterwards though.  Right To Play has lots of those, and gets people comfortable with their bodies and appropriate physical contact.

Looking out my desk window in the hotel room at the moment.  It’s teeming with rain and I listen to Handel (Watermusik.. chuckle.) as I write.  My view looks like ivy or trellis.  But it’s electrical cords and barbed wire.  Surreal.

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The Youth of Claratown, Monrovia Liberia

charity, FAM, International, ROAM By March 4, 2013 Tags: , , , , , , 1 Comment

Claratown MonroviaAfter hours of games – in one spot 40 kids had been selected to participate and over 300 showed up – I was able to really see the theories behind Right To Play.  It is genius and the youth of Claratown, Monrovia, Liberia showed me the learning and laughter produced by Right To Play.  I keep thinking of the parallels it has to the theatre sports of my youth and university years, teaching  attention to detail, conversational abilities, control of the body and leadership.  After every game (not a soccer match, but a shorter activity such as ‘What time is it Mr. Wolf’ or ‘Find the person in the circle who is leading the activity’ or ‘find whose hand the stone is hidden in’ – there is a very deep discussion about the lessons learned.  Some games invite you to state your name proudly as you go around the circle.  I did that one in theatre school continually.  Others ask you to say the name of a country or boy’s name in a claratown schoolmetronome-like tempo – the trick being you can’t repeat one said already.  Bails of laughter resounded when I hesitated and shouted ‘Britney’ for a girl’s name.  They all thought I was perfect, as I was white.  But no.  You should have seen their faces when they had to mimic an action and I chose the Gangam Style jumps!

There are also other games that I played like Mosquito Tag that teach about issues pertaining to the local culture: sleep under a mosquito net, reduce garbage and don’t leave water standing.  In others, we talked about the meaning of discrimination, segregation and equality.  With the smaller kids we worked on left and right, body parts, physicality and focus as well as healthy eating (the fruit salad game!).

Claratown OuthouseIt was so special to have the opportunity to speak with locals.  They think we have no problems in North America.  I explained the homeless in Vancouver, the sexual assault, poverty and murders throughout our country.  They were shocked.  I talked about food banks and violence and they realized that perhaps we are not as shiny as we may seem.  I watched them cook and set up individual businesses buying bleach or grain in bulk and selling it in small packets for a profit.  This was not only a poverty-stricken society, but almost operated as if it were 1800 – the cell phone charging stations aside.

After two vigourous play sessions, I attended a two and a half- hour forum on drugs and youth. It was lengthy and – wow – the West African accents are hard to understand!  But I was floored.  These youth leaders – from teens to mid-thirties – arranged this event with guests.  Our Claratown vendorsCanadian group of 7 were special attendees.  But the mayor and governor of the region also attended.  And two representatives from the Drug Enforcement Agency.  I hadn’t been in such a formal atmosphere since student government days at Queen’s.  The Queen’s students had nothing on these statesmen.  Points were discussed, debated, restated and analyzed.

IClara Town Youth Meeting came to a realization.  This conversation and articulation was the next logical phase of the Right to Play programs in which I was participating.  After being kids, people become youth leaders and then full-on volunteers who run groups all over Monrovia.  In Westpoint there were 9 circles of at least 40 kids.  The leaders were better than most counselors I have had in my life (don’t make me tell you how many).  And they were jobless.  They volunteer their time because they realize that if they don’t, their community will implode once these kids reach a certain age.

At the meeting, six-time Olympian Clara Hughes spoke for our group about her drug use as a teen.  A pin could have dropped.  These topics are not discussed in West Africa.  There are trucks that sell shoe polish to ensure appearances are tidy and yet there is no affordable way to go to the bathroom.  She then talked about determination and the blessings she received by having leaders, coaches and trainers.  And how, despite her difficult past, went to to win Olympic medals for Canada during both the summer and winter games.

History was made at this meeting.  I kept thinking of the French Revolution.  Seeing fourty people who have been through a recent war, and whose brothers and parents now suffer the effects of cocaine and marijuana, I could feel change bubbling within the room.  And these people all experienced Right To Play programs after being through a horrific war.  I would argue that my children cannot articulate in public the way the children involved in Right To Play programs had as we ‘played’.  And at the meeting?  I wish I could hire the whole lot of them to negotiate for me and run my company.

Claratown childrenAfter the discussions we were blessed with African drumming and dance of some local children outside the building.  There was a 3 year old who couldn’t control herself and followed along.  The hope extended from inside to out.

In case you missed the first travel article focused on West Point it is archived here.

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West Point, Monrovia. I had No Idea

International, ROAM By March 1, 2013 Tags: , , , , , , , , , 1 Comment

I walked into my Right To Play circle and felt insecure.  And then a little boy looked at me.  His name was George.  George Washington.  Seriously.  This is Liberia.   And we held hands and he showed me what to do.  I couldn’t really understand the thick accent of the group leader and I kept doing everything wrong.  I started to relax and got into it after one of the kids squeezed my hand. I had just come into one of the poorest slums in the world on a slow road with people everywhere. West Point, Monrovia.  I had No Idea.  It smelled of fish and feces.  Fruit was carried in buckets on heads and babies on backs.  And I hadn’t really regrouped yet.  After 36 hours of travel, I landed in the dark in an unknown country.  My family was worried for my safety (Google Liberia and you see only images of the recent war).  I didn’t really know what to expect.  But I trusted Right To Play.  And so I should have.

We played short games that I could only relate to my many years of theatre (which everyone joked was a form of therapy).  The games taught trust, learning and self-revelation.   In one we were a team acting as a dragon.  With arms around the waist of the person in front, the head of the dragon had to catch the tail.  Many of us ended in the sand but before falling, we moved as a group, anticipating the collective movement.  In another – I think we call it ‘telephone’ in North America – a phrase was passed around the circle and the final person announced what it ended up being.  We talked about discrimination and judgement.

After the final game we did an au revoir, kind of like ballet class when you thank the teacher and your peers.  Clap clap head bend, clap clap head bend, clap clap, blow kisses!  (In a fab rhythm of course).  Giggles and laughter all around.

Liberia House WestpointWalking out of the games area we went into the harsh reality of these kids’ lives.  The uniforms always make people look so wealthy.  (But I did notice a tear in the back of George’s shirt that needed mending.) I saw a pile of other kids not enrolled in school who were not participating in the Right To Play programs that day.  (There are special play days for all the children in the community including those who do not go to school). They wouldn’t make eye contact and were yearning to be a part of the action.  The games.  The learning.  Very different from the kids who just told me the definition of discrimination with confidence and big voices.  My heart broke.

We past corrugated tin houses down the 3 foot-wide dirt pathways.  To visit the school.  The whole thing was the size of one Vancouver classroom, but with 6 classrooms, grades K-6 plus the principal’s office (all labeled with cardboard).  The kids were packed like chickens (but still grinning) and Right To Play is currently raising money for a new school.  These are the lucky kids.  Many of their teachers are Right To Play leaders as well, using the curriculum for the phys-ed portion of the day.   Boys, and girls were all hankering to get into my photos.  And to, of course, see the result shown on my fancy SLR screen.

Liberia Cooking AreaWe then wandered through more alleyways to the beach.  En route I was offered some local fare.  Manioc.  Crisped beans.  Porridge. Fish from the boats off the beach.  You see, there is no power here.  No water.  Fish is the staple (thank goodness for boat launches from the beach) and it is caught and dried.  Huge barrels burn with wood to cook and preserve the treats from the ocean.  This was the first smell.

Descending on the beach, after running into a woman cleaning up garbage (since Right To Play began, some community members have formed a volunteer group to make the area more habitable), I looked at the extraordinary view, white sand and clear water.  I only found one shell.  It was like the beaches of the Bahamas.  And then I realized what the second smell was about.  I saw a few dark spots and got warned about where I stepped.  My head was spinning.  And then there was a young boy.  Probably 6, he pulled his trousers down as he squatted.  And then there were three boys doing the same.  Their families couldn’t afford the 5 Liberian dollars for the use of the new latrines (ones on stilts that dump into the ocean).  Many women are pregnant here and families on average (I would guess) for the area – 4 kids, 2 adults.  That’s about $1US per day to use a toilet with privacy.  And the average income?  $1.25.  Beach it is I guess.  I walked through the latrine runoff in order to get back to our vehicle as I watched many kids play in the water.  These people need a well.

Liberia FishingThe women carried babies on their backs – a feat I was astounded about.  One used a towel.  We go back Thursday and I am getting up the confidence for a lesson.  The men hung in groups, a few manned stores and many scowled at my camera.  (Understandably many feel that I am about to exploit their plight to make money in the West by taking a photo with my expensive SLR).

And that was only the morning.  We drove out – 6 of us, silent.  The cockroaches and malfunctioning AC in the hotel room seem pretty good right now.  I want to play with the kids again.

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In Anticipation of Play

International, ROAM By February 24, 2013 Tags: , , , , , , , No Comments

Play in AfricaI am packed.  The technology is charged (and needs its own bag).  My sneakers are ready to go.  And there is only 1 pair of wedges in the suitcase (I couldn’t go cold turkey).  To have been given this opportunity is astounding.  In a few days I will participate in an all-female Liberian kick-ball tournament, meet representatives of other organizations that support Right To Play’s efforts in Liberia and chat with families and children in more than 5 communities in Monrovia.

The mayor of West Vancouver has sent a letter and dozens of pins and my communities are brimming with support and well wishes.  Facebook. Email. Phone calls.  Twitter.  Personal hugs.  I am humbled and overwhelmed.  A few short months ago, I knew so little about the development of communities, including my own.  I’m actually quite a shy person and can be reluctant to share and truly know people.

This campaign to raise awareness for Right To Play made me realize not only the incredible things that come out of play, but how a community can truly come together for a cause.  I have bonded with people who were once strangers by mentioning my involvement with Right To Play.  Eyes light up and all of a sudden I realize that a parent at the school lived in Africa, the passport picture photographer used to volunteer teaching sports to inner-city children and my doctor donates to Right To Play.  Advice is rampant.  Everyone wants to know how they can donate, and for the first time since I last performed in the theatre, I feel part of something much bigger and more impactful than I can even imagine.

Play teaches determination, leadership, how to be a part of a team, how to balance sport and school and discipline.  Gender equality and sportsmanship are enhanced.  Laughter abounds.  And Right To Play has already truly taught me to be part of my own community.  I am bursting to see the programs in action!

My final task is to pick the boys up from school and do a bit of shopping.  Very exciting shopping.  (Not that my heart doesn’t usually skip a beat when I see a store.)  This task, however, will be a selfless one.  It will be an exciting excursion for my kids when I hand them a few bills at the dollar store and ask them to choose whatever they think the children of Liberia would love.  How amazing as a parent to see what my children will think kids in Africa would want!

My heart is so full and my head may explode with the lessons I have already learned.  I can’t even imagine what is waiting for me in West Africa.

Let the games begin!  I am ready to play and can’t wait to share the journey with you all.

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Playtime! Let’s Level the Field

Contests By January 31, 2013 Tags: , , , 1 Comment

At UrbanMommies some of our most popular articles focus on ‘energy busters for toddlers’, ‘top fun and educational iPad apps for kids’ and ‘games to play at the beach’.  In North America, we place an incredibly high value on playtime and as parents, we are taught to spend at least 30 minutes per day on the floor with our kids, building lego, throwing a ball or stacking blocks.

The other day, my 5 year old and I waited for my older son to finish his tae kwon do class at our local community centre.  While we waited, we… blush.. played tag in the lobby.  This boisterous disruption would typically be frowned upon in another atmosphere, but his giggles incited smiles on faces of all of the other parents.  I felt like a rockstar.  Best Mom Ever.   (Little do they know…) And my child was happy, active and connected.  The approving looks from other moms only reinforced that in our society, we value play pretty highly.

Skills learned from sport teach our kids determination, leadership abilities, fairness, equality, how to be a part of a team, how to balance play and school, drive, and discipline.

Don’t you think it’s odd that only 5% of Canadians surveyed in a 2012 Ipsos Reid poll believed that play is important in developing countries?  Read: Play is a luxury only when healthcare, conflicts, education and other problems are dealt with.  I’d love to try and explain that to my 5 year old.  “Sorry dear.  We can’t play ball.  We need to debate health care reform and do something about gun control first.  Maybe when you’re older.”

Don’t the lessons learned through play work towards resolving all of these big issues?

This is what Leveling The Field with Right To Play is about.  According to the Canadian Council on Learning, play nourishes every aspect of children’s development – it forms the foundation of intellectual, social, physical, and emotional skills necessary for success in school and in life.  Play paves the way for learning.

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Liberia – The Trip of a Lifetime

charity, FAM By December 18, 2012 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , 3 Comments

Right To Play ParentAnd then there was the week that I didn’t really sleep.  Olympian Kaylyn Kyle and I were behind in votes.  I called in a ton of favours and spread the message in creative (and largely annoying) ways.  Friends knew how important Liberia was to me and would ask daily about vote count.  As I had an emotional drop-off of one of my kids at school, a mom embraced me and encouraged me to share about my children and my life.  During our conversation I shared about “Level The Field” and her eyes lit up.  She had worked for the Swedish Olympic team for the 2010 Vancouver Olympics and is very familiar with the organization and the benefit of sports for kids.  Rocking her newborn in the stroller, she mentioned that she had a few friends in the sports field (that was a pun..) and would reach out to them to help our cause for Health in Liberia.

Fast forward.  Several days after the contest closed I was practicing square breathing and coaxing myself to carry on with life.  My friends and colleagues didn’t want to ask too much.  I was clearly distracted.  I got the email indicating I would go to Liberia while headed to the gym and became one of those people on her phone during an hour of cardio I hadn’t really noticed.  (I joked with Kaylyn that if we were to travel together she’d put my abs to shame).  Could it be true?  Could Liberia have won – when George Weah, one of Liberia’s most famous humanitarian athletes was a footballer as well?  Liberia needs so much support after recent years of civil war.  200,000 people have died and it ranks amongst the poorest nations on the planet.  Inequality.  Sexual crimes.  Disease.  The women, children and the handicapped youth need the teachings of inclusiveness that Right To Play can offer.

A few days later I was on a press trip to Ottawa and was about to tour the Canadian Parliament Buildings when I got another email announcing the voter who had won the chance to accompany the group on our expedition.  Her name is Lori Harasem and she lives in Alberta.  With three kids she finds time to work as the Recreation and Culture Development Manager for the City of Lethbridge and volunteers too.

Apparently Lori and I had a mutual friend.  Could it be?  I sent a covert text to my friend from my sons’ school to see if she knew Lori.  Apparently they were childhood friends and Lori was described as an extremely special, caring and loyal woman with a true believe and love of sport and play.  I tingled head to toe.  And then I toured the crucible of Canadian law and government feeling the importance of community, integrity and outreach.  The stately building made me realize even further that our position as Canadians allows us to help other nations – other children.  I am so honoured to be an ambassador for Right To Play.  To represent my country and to help children smile.  Somehow my kids’ Christmas lists don’t seem very pressing.

As I expressed to the other parent ambassadors when we were simultaneously told the news, I have been humbled just to be chosen to participate in the Level The Field program.  The prestigious group of parents who participated did a stellar job, and I still marvel at the work put in and the exposure that was given to the organization.  The true winners are the kids that we will be able to support through awareness and future donations.  Wouldn’t it be wonderful if all 6 West African nations could have oodles of funds flowing in?  I know that Right To Play is dear to all of our hearts now and hopefully in time we will all be able to help all of the 6 countries.  in the Level The Field program and the 20 countries Right To Play works in across the world.  If you would like to receive the Right To Play newsletter, you can subscribe on their website.

I told my schoolyard mom friend the news and the next day she cornered me as we waited for the bell.  Her son wants to start raising money to send soccer balls with me to Liberia.  He has a plan.  He’s 7.  And clearly very special.

Let the journey begin!

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Are Sport and Play a Luxury?

LIVE, play By November 14, 2012 Tags: , , , , , , No Comments

What is a luxury?  Louis Vuitton, of course.  And silk pajamas.  A suite at the Four Seasons. Truffles are at the top of my list.  This is fun.  I like this game.  But what about less obvious facets of life like health and education?  Are sport and play a luxury?  Life skills?  Are the notions of co-operation, teamwork and fairness luxuries too?

When we think of what ‘should be’ important in less fortunate countries, Canadians think of the ‘biggies’.   We wince at photos of malnourished mothers trying to nurse, children with guns and sexual violence.  We project our values onto other societies.  When asked what should be the most important focus for these nations in a 2012 Ipsos Reid survey*, Canadians came up with these top four:

1.  Healthcare (36%)
2.  Conflict-free environment (24 %)
3.  Education (23%)
4.  Gender equality (7%).

(I’ll hold out comment on gender equality coming in at 7%.)

But what if there were a magical bean that could work towards resolving all of these big issues?

When our Canadian infants are young we are instructed to engage in ‘floor time’, playing blocks and puzzles with our little ones.  We trundle to the soccer fields in the rain and learn hopscotch.  How did you first learn about sharing?  A play-date where little Tommy wanted your Star Wars lego, right?  And what about gender equality?  I bet it was when Molly smucked you at checkers.  Canadian parents know innately the importance of play to our society and the development of our kids.  We are fortunate to not have to worry about war, water, disease and education. But only 5 per cent of parents see access to play as the most important factor for children in developing countries.

Play should be a luxury for no one.

In Canada we feel that sports help keep kids healthy and (more importantly!) out of trouble.  Children learn teamwork, gender equality and meet people from other places and backgrounds.  (Remember that hunky guy from the other city’s basketball team?)  Our kids set goals (which often mean that we get up at 4am to get to the hockey rink or pool), they learn how to concentrate, co-operate and properly channel aggression.

According to the survey results:

“When it comes to skills learned from sports that respondents used to help them with their education, responses included that skills acquired from sports taught them determination, leadership abilities, how to be a part of a team, how to balance play and school, drive, and discipline.” (excerpt from Right To Play Global Youth Summit survey results)

This is what Leveling The Field with Right To Play is about.  According to the Canadian Council on Learning, play nourishes every aspect of children’s development – it forms the foundation of intellectual, social, physical, and emotional skills necessary for success in school and in life.  Play paves the way for learning.

Shouldn’t kids in West Africa have the same opportunities that Canadian kids do?  If we can touch the areas of education, conflict, health and (lastly) gender equality through sport and play just think of the possibilities.

Not a tough magic bean to swallow.

You can support “Level the Field” by voting daily for one of six campaigns on the Right to Play Facebook fan page.  The winning parent and athlete ambassador team will travel to West Africa to help implement a program, and one of the Right to Play Canada voters will join them!  You can also help the organization and keep up to date with Right to Play when you subscribe to their newsletter.

*This survey is based on a sample of 1015 respondents commissioned by Right To Play and conducted by Ipsos Reid during September 17 – 24, 2012.  The results of the survey have a credibility interval of +/- 3.5 percentage points of all Canadians.


 

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Level The Field with Right To Play

charity, FAM By October 30, 2012 Tags: , , , , , , , 1 Comment

Liberia Health SoccerIt’s been a rough week.  My son is having a hard time with self-esteem and handling stress.  He is lashing out and struggling and as his mother, I feel my heart breaking piece by piece.

But today is soccer day.  He was up, dressed and ready to get inspired by his coach and teammates.  He runs.  He plays.  He tells the kid who missed the pass that it’s ok.  Living in such a privileged community does not fix the growing pains that kids go through, but having abundant resources to help makes everything easier.  I have seen first-hand how sport and guidance help children thrive.

Liberia HealthI am honoured to be part of a new program with Right To Play called Level The Field.  The organization operates to create a healthier and safer world through the power of sport and play to help create a level field and equal opportunities for children everywhere.  Teamwork, cooperation and respect are explored in fun ways and community leaders act as coaches to change behaviours.  Right To Play’s innovative methodology is grounded in a deep understanding of social learning theory and child development needs.  Through sport and activities adapted from local traditional games, mental, physical and psycho-social well-being of the children improve.  (And I have a hunch that the parents feel pretty good as they watch their children play and laugh.)

Typically my writing is laced with wit and fluff.  But as I write today, tears are close.  I read about the children in Liberia and I think about my son’s behavior.  What do mothers feel when their children get sick because they haven’t learned that washing hands can prevent disease?  If my heart is breaking from watching my son suffer, what would it be like for parents living in disadvantaged areas of the world?  We all grow up with our own context and it is difficult to compare hardships, but I can’t help wanting to do everything in my power to help those moms smile as they watch their children thrive and grow.
Right To Play has given me the gift and opportunity to be able to help them raise awareness about the work they do every day, all over the world..  I have been partnered with Kaylyn Kyle, Vancouver Whitecaps soccer goddess and Olympic medalist.  Together, we promote how we can help level the field for children through play with a focus on how play can positively impact the health of those in Liberia.

Liberia Children Right To PlayLiberia is one of the poorest countries in the world with one of the highest incidences of malnutrition, infectious disease and other global health concerns. 85% of people live below the world poverty line*.   A massive civil war between 1989-2003 not only modeled violent combat for the children, but it created a lack of trust in people from other communities.  After Right To Play started working with local communities in Liberia in 2008, there are more organized sports and activities and people from various communities play together.  Children are less likely to reach for weapons and fists to settle conflicts.  And 183 local leaders and supervisors have been trained as positive role models.  People with disabilities are now included in play, and girls and boys are now playing together more often, in a country with a high incidence of sexual violence and a history of gender inequality.

Level The Field video

I’m embarrassed.  Not only did I not know about the work done by Right To Play, but I didn’t have a handle on how bad things are in disadvantaged countries around the world. Did you know that 26,000 children under the age of 5 die every day?  Infectious diseases such as HIV, measles and diarrheal disease are largely preventable.  I can’t stop shaking at the thought of the mothers watching their toddlers die.  We need to help.  Please encourage Right To Play’s activities and help us promote children’s health in Liberia by visiting the Level The Field page on Facebook. By voting for our program, or the program you feel most passionately about on Facebook, you can help us raise awareness about Right To Play’s work and also enter for a chance to accompany the team with the most votes on a visit to see a Right To Play program in-action.  We need to lessen the number of broken hearts in this world.

Level The Field with Right To Play*Source: Charitywater.org

 

 

 

 

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