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thanksgiving

6 iPad Recipe Apps and Accessories for Thanksgiving

apps, GEAR By September 20, 2013 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , 2 Comments

We know you’ve done it: spilled flour/milk/grape jelly on your iPad while trying to follow a recipe.  This Thanksgiving, spend more time on the table decor and less on futzing around with recipe books by getting technical.  There are a few things you’ll need, but we guarantee you’ll become hooked.  Not only will you want to spend all your time trying new things in the kitchen, but your prowess will win over the hearts and health of the family.  We’ve got 6 iPad recipe apps and accessories that will make your Thanksgiving dinner easy-peasy. Ready?

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Thanksgiving Tips from Martha Stewart Weddings Darcy Miller

EAT, holidays By November 21, 2012 Tags: , , , , , , 2 Comments

I have been infatuated with Darcy Miller, Editorial Director of Martha Stewart Weddings from the first time I ever saw a luscious spread in the magazine and was planning my own wedding.  (I drove my wedding planned nuts, BTW. “But in Martha Stewart I saw….”)

We know how important entertaining is in terms of role modelling for your kids.  As a child I remember holiday ‘children’s tables’ that made me feel special and kept me on my best behaviour during special occasions.  So who better than Darcy Miller to demonstrate affordable and easy ways to create a gorgeous Thanksgiving table.

Darcy shares tips and deals with us so that you can create her show-stopping look in your own home.  We’re sure you must already get it in your RSS feeds but in case you want some last-minute tips, here are her ideas on the Martha Stewart Living website.

Happy Thanksgiving, and may your children embrace the memories that they will pass on to their own kids one day.

 

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Acadian Turkey a la King

EAT, family meals By December 20, 2010 Tags: , , , , , No Comments

We’re not even going to presume to give you a different Christmas or Thanksgiving turkey recipe than the one your family normally uses, but we will suspect that come Boxing Day, you’ll have a ton of turkey waiting to be ‘remade’ into family-friendly dishes.  (Aren’t you glad we didn’t say leftovers?)  This is a great recipe, and you can substitute tofu or chicken for those who want to avoid the tryptophan-induced sleepiness that comes on after eating turkey.  Here’s our take on Acadian Turkey a la King.

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Leftover turkey ideas for kids

EAT, family meals, holidays By October 5, 2010 Tags: , , , No Comments

Wondering what to do with all that wonderful leftover turkey from your last holiday? Here’s a healthy and delicious way to use that leftover turkey that your kids will love!

2 English muffins or Whole-wheat bun
2 leaves romaine lettuce
2 cups chopped skinless leftover turkey (white meat)
1/4 cup Hellmann’s® ½ the Fat mayonnaise-type dressing
1 /2 tsp lemon juice
2 tsp. grated parmesan
Pinch of parsley
cracked pepper

Mix turkey, Hellmann’s®, parsley, lemon juice and parmesan. Add lettuce and stuff between two slices of bread. Makes 2 portions.

Chuck’s Sandwich-Making Tips

  • Have fun with leftovers. Sandwiches are a great way to transform leftovers into a delicious snack or meal. Try unusual fillings to make the most out of leftover food.
  • Plan ahead. Gourmet-inspired ingredients such as caramelized onions, seasoned mayonnaise, and roasted red peppers can take a sandwich from ho-hum to amazing. Prepare ingredients that require a little extra effort ahead of time or on the weekends when you’re less busy and keep them in the fridge to use all week.

– Chuck Hughes loves to create fab healthy sandwiches.

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Healthy Thanksgiving Eating Tips

eat, LIVE By October 5, 2010 Tags: , , , , , , No Comments

It’s harvest time. So take advantage of fall’s bounty and fill your plate with the season’s freshest flavours and you’ll actually be doing yourself a favour. You needn’t compromise taste or tradition to stay on track this Thanksgiving season.

Some of the season’s most traditional foods are packed with health. Here’s a taste:

Brussel Sprouts:  Are a huge source of fiber, containing four grams of equal parts soluble and insoluble fiber. And they are touted for their cancer-fighting properties.

Zucchini
: Perhaps best known for its vitamin C content, is also a good source of vitamin A and lutein, which is important for eye health, as well as folate and potassium.

Pumpkin: It’s an antioxidant powerhouse, filled with beta-carotene, vitamins C and E, potassium, and a hefty dose of veggie fiber. The seeds offer a wallop of protein, fiber, iron and potassium. Canned purree is good too, just watch for sugar.

Sweet potato: Coined as a superfood, it is an excellent source of beta-carotene, a very good source of vitamin C, B6, manganese, and a good source of copper, dietary fiber, potassium and iron. It is an antioxidant food that works in the body to eliminate free radicals and is also a natural anti-inflammatory.

Turkey: It’s a very good source of zinc, vitamins B6, B12, protein, selenium, niacin, and the amino acid tryptothan. Roasted skinless, white meat has less total fat, and less saturated fat and cholesterol than chicken, pork or beef. So make sure to go skinless.

  • Don’t go hungry. Just because it’s Thanksgiving, make sure to eat a whole grain filled breakfast and lunch. Don’t look at the meal as an endless buffet you are saving up for. Stop the madness of piling the plate. Remember you are celebrating Thanksgiving. So give thanks to your body by not over eating.
  • Watch portion size: Go for smaller portions. This way you can sample all the different foods. Moderation is always the key.
  • Make a conscious choice to limit high fat items: Remember try to eat vegetables as close to their whole, natural state as possible. Traditional dishes—like fried and creamy dishes as well as cheese or sugar-filled casseroles—are where the high fat lurks. If you cannot control the ingredients that go into a dish, simply limit yourself to a smaller helping size. Again moderation is the key.
  • Skip the gravy boat: The gravy is where all the saturated fat lurks. Instead, opt for the cranberry sauce. Cranberries are huge source of antioxidants and promote gastrointestinal and oral health. So skip the boat.
  • Keep to the special stuff:  No need to graze on the chips, cheese, and other assorted treats scattered around. Wait for the main event.
  • Don’t give in to the tryptophan: Go for a walk instead with family or friends and walk some of the calories.
  • Don’t cut your favorites out completely: If you indulge occasional, you will be less likely to binge. So go for it, but again, moderation is key.
  • Be Mindful how good that first bite is: No other bite will taste as good. You’ll be getting more calories but not necessarily more pleasure. For dessert, leave behind the pie crusts. Ever notice how seconds are nearly as pleasurable?
  • Help clear the table: Rather than sitting and picking at leftovers.

The Season’s Best Bets: Skinless white turkey, roasted sweet potatoes, plain vegetables, defatted gravy or cranberry sauce, pumpkin pie, wine spritzers.

We work with busy women who are starved for time, hungry for balance and crave more energy. We help them develop and instill individual lifestyle solutions so they feel fabulous while they maximize their time doing what they love.  The modern woman can do it all. Nourished will show you how. Alyssa-Schottland Bauman received her training to practice Health Counseling at the Institute for Integrative Nutrition, which is the only nutrition school integrating all the different dietary theories—combining the knowledge of traditional philosophies with modern concepts like the USDA food pyramid, the glycemic index, the Zone and raw foods. www.nourished.ca

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