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family meal

Peach, Goat Cheese and Basil Flatbread Pizza

EAT, family meals By April 16, 2014 Tags: , , , , , , No Comments

Peach Goat Cheese Basil FlatbreadDon’t know what to make for dinner tonight, this peach, goat cheese and basil flatbread pizza might become your go-to recipe.

2 naan, about 9-inches (23-cm) each or 1 thin pizza crust, about 11-inches (27.5-cm)
2 tsp (10 mL) olive oil
11/2 tsp (7 mL) za’atar spice*
½ cup (125 mL) creamy goat cheese
2 slices prosciutto, cut into strips
2 canned California Cling peach halves, cut into thin slices, well drained and patted dry
4 pitted black olives, cut in half
4 fresh basil leaves, shredded

1. Preheat oven according to package directions for naan or pizza. Brush tops with oil. Sprinkle each naan with ½ tsp (2 mL) za’atar or pizza with 1 tsp (5 mL) za’atar.

2. Place on baking sheet. Dollop evenly with goat cheese. Then scatter with prosciutto, peaches and olives. Bake according to package directions, until crust is hot and cheese is melted, about 2 to 4 minutes for naan and 6 to 8 minutes for pizza.

3. Remove from oven. Sprinkle with remaining ½ tsp (2 mL) za’atar and basil. Makes 2 servings for naan or 2 to 3 for pizza

*Za’atar is a blend of dried thyme, oregano, sumac and sesame seeds. Sometime ground cumin and salt is added.

Makes 6 servings

Jill Amery

Jill Amery is a mom of 2 small boys and the Publisher of UrbanMommies, a stylish digital lifestyle magazine filled with fitness, style, health, recipes and savvy mom advice to help you through pregnancy, birth, and raising your kids.

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Sweet Chili Chicken Peach Wrap

Sweet Chili Chicken and Peach Wraps

EAT, family meals By April 16, 2014 Tags: , , , , , , 1 Comment

Instead of tortillas, try this gluten-free alternative. They’re easy to make, a super way to use leftovers and customize to your own taste.

11/4 cups (300 mL) cut into strips cooked chicken
3 tbsp (45 mL) Thai sweet chili sauce
1 (14 oz/398 mL) can California Cling peach halves or slices, in fruit juice concentrate or light syrup, drained and patted really dry
8 large rice paper round wraps
4 very small leaves Boston or leaf lettuce, torn in half
3-inch (7.5-cm) piece cucumber piece, cut into julienne strips
1/2 small red pepper, cut into julienne strips
8 to 12 mint leaves (optional)
Additional Thai sweet chili sauce for dipping

1. Have all your ingredients prepared. In a small bowl, stir chicken with sweet chili sauce. Fill a pie plate with warm water. Lay a damp smooth kitchen towel on the counter. Thinly cut peach halves into slices or use peach slices.

2. Working with 1 wrap at a time, dip in warm water until it is just pliable, 20 to 40 seconds. Place on kitchen towel. Place ½ a lettuce leaf near bottom of circle. Place 2 peach slices on top of lettuce, followed by 1/8 of chicken, then 1/8 of the cucumber and red pepper and 2 to 3 mint leaves depending on size.

3. Fold bottom (edge closest to you) of rice paper wrap over filling towards centre. Fold in sides to slightly cover filling. Then roll to totally enclose filling and form a roll. Set seam side down on a cutting board. Repeat with remaining ingredients. If sending for lunch, leave whole. If serving as an appetizer, slice in half diagonally. Serve with additional sweet chili sauce.  Best eaten right away but if storing, make sure they aren’t touching each other as they will stick. Cover with barely damp paper towel, then seal tightly with plastic wrap.

Makes 8 rolls

Jill Amery

Jill Amery is a mom of 2 small boys and the Publisher of UrbanMommies, a stylish digital lifestyle magazine filled with fitness, style, health, recipes and savvy mom advice to help you through pregnancy, birth, and raising your kids.

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6 Minute Breakfast Frittata

EAT, family meals By April 2, 2014 Tags: , , , , , , , , , 1 Comment

6 Minute Breakfast Frittata

I love this recipe for a very quick breakfast frittata. It looks especially divine with fresh chives drizzled throughout!

Ingredients:

8 Eggs
10 tiny tomatoes chopped in half
3 slices cubed bread
1/2 cup chopped ham
1/2 cup grated cheese
1/4 c milk
1T olive oil
1/4 cup chopped fresh chives
salt and pepper to taste

Mix all ingredients in a bowl as you heat oil in a skillet on medium heat. Pour egg mixture into skillet and cook 4 minutes. Try not to touch it as it cooks. Using two spatulas, gently flip over your frittata and cook another 2 minutes.

Cut and serve.

Jill Amery

Jill Amery is a mom of 2 small boys and the Publisher of UrbanMommies, a stylish digital lifestyle magazine filled with fitness, style, health, recipes and savvy mom advice to help you through pregnancy, birth, and raising your kids.

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Mickey Mouse Lobster Cream Pappardelle

EAT, family meals By March 28, 2014 Tags: , , , , , , , , 1 Comment

Mickey Mouse Lobster Pappardelle.jpgLobster Cream Pappardelle:

1 cup heavy cream
1/2 c white wine
1 cup lobster stock (or vegetable)
2 cloves garlic
2 T fresh thyme
1 medium onion, diced
1 T butter
1 T fine flour
2 cups diced lobster tails

2 bags dried pappardelle

Method:

1. Saute the onion in butter over medium heat until soft.
2. Deglaze the pan with wine and add stock.
3. Reduce liquid to 1/2 cup.
4. Add flour while stirring constantly.
5. Add garlic and thyme and cook 2 minutes while stirring – you don’t want the garlic to burn.
6. Pour in heavy cream and allow it to thicken. You may have to add a bit more flour depending on your preference.
7. Meanwhile, cook the pappardelle in boiling water.
8. Add the chopped lobster to the sauce so that it is warm but do not overcook.
9. Mix the al dente pasta and the sauce together and form Mickey heads on a plate.
10. Serve with Mickey-shaped garlic bread.

Serves 8

Jill Amery

Jill Amery is a mom of 2 small boys and the Publisher of UrbanMommies, a stylish digital lifestyle magazine filled with fitness, style, health, recipes and savvy mom advice to help you through pregnancy, birth, and raising your kids.

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Sanity-Saving Supper Time Tips

EAT, family meals By March 25, 2014 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , No Comments

Sanity-Saving Supper Time TipsBy Lianne Phllipson-Webb, Sprout Right

In the spring as the weather improves, kids can get even busier with after school and evening activities. This can make supper time a challenge. How do you feed your hungry crowd healthy food, and quickly? Here are three sanity-saving supper time tips that will make your weekday meal prep a cinch.

  1. Weekends are for Prepping

Make some time for your weekday meal prep. Head to the grocery store and fill your fridge with fresh fruits, vegetables and protein. Create a plan for weekday meals and prepare by washing and cutting up veggies, grilling or roasting meats.

  1. Think BIG

Think BIG when it comes to meals and always aim to have a hearty amount of leftovers. Leftovers make great lunches for the next day and they can also form the foundation of your next supper. Cook a whole chicken (or two) instead of cooking a chicken breast and cut up the meat to make a salad or taco for the next night. Incorporate casseroles that please a crowd, and heat up great, like homemade lasagna.

  1. A Team Sport

Involve your kids as much as possible in meal preparation. Find age-appropriate activities like ripping lettuce leaves (pre-schoolers) and cutting up raw veggies (school-age). Even toddlers can help by grabbing their own plate and fork and helping to set the table. You can have “make your own” nights, where you put out the basic ingredients and the kids choose how to put their meal together. Examples include make your own pasta night, a chili bar (with hot chili, cheese, veggies and potatoes) and make your own taco night. Getting the whole family involved at mealtime not only helps you, it helps your kids learn skills toward independence.

Do you have some favourite recipes for quick and easy weekday meals? How do you save your sanity at suppertime?

Lianne Phillipson-Webb is the founder of Sprout Right, a company that specializes in pre-conception, prenatal, and postnatal nutrition for women, as well as good food and health for the whole family. With over ten years of experience, Lianne is a registered nutritionist, author, member of the International Organization of Nutrition Consultants, and mother of two.

Jill Amery

Jill Amery is a mom of 2 small boys and the Publisher of UrbanMommies, a stylish digital lifestyle magazine filled with fitness, style, health, recipes and savvy mom advice to help you through pregnancy, birth, and raising your kids.

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How do I switch to organic

How Do You Switch to Organic?

EAT, family meals, snacks By January 2, 2014 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , 6 Comments

Switching to organic is a tough decision for many families. By choosing organic versions of the family’s most consumed foods, you can increase the percentage of organic food in your diet without big changes to your shopping cart or your spending. Opting for organic produce, for instance, doesn’t necessarily have a big impact, depending on what you eat. The key is to be strategic in your organic purchases. But how do you switch to organic? Like this.

According to the Environmental Working Group, commercially-farmed fruits and vegetables vary in their levels of pesticide residue. Here’s their standard of when to choose organic and when it’s OK to go conventional.

Dirty Dozen—These should always be organic: Nectarines, Celery, Pears, Apples, Cherries, Berries, Imported Grapes, Spinach, Potatoes, Bell Peppers, Lettuce.

Clean fifteen—It’s OK to opt for conventional here: Onions, Avocados, Sweet corn, Pineapple, Mangos, Asparagus, Sweet peas, Kiwi, Cabbage, Eggplant, Papaya, Watermelon, Broccoli, Tomato, Sweet potato.  (Tip: Print this and slip it in your wallet.)

Why Organic?

Nutrient Dense: Reports of organic food not being better for you are outdated. A brand new analysis of about 100 studies, including more than 40 published in the past 3 years, found that the average levels of nearly a dozen nutrients are 25% higher in organic produce.

Consume Fewer Toxins
: Eating the 12 most contaminated fruits and vegetables exposes you to about 14 pesticides a day. A study supported by the EPA measured pesticide levels in children’s urine before and after a switch to an organic diet. After just 5 days, the chemicals decreased to trace levels.

TOP ORGANIC PICKS

1. Milk: Most children drink milk everyday or in large quantities so this is one product not to skimp out on when it comes to choosing between organic and non. Also, when you choose a glass of conventional milk, you are buying into a whole chemical system of agriculture. Organic milk doesn’t contain the harmful antibiotics, artificial and growth hormones and pesticides that are used in commercial dairy.

2. Potatoes: Potatoes are a staple of the North American diet—an alarming fact in itself—one survey found they account for 30% of our overall vegetable consumption. A simple switch to organic potatoes has the potential to have a big impact because commercially-farmed potatoes are some of the most pesticide-contaminated vegetables. Root vegetables absorb herbicides, pesticides, and fungicides that wind up in soil. Potatoes are treated with fungicides during the growing season, and then sprayed with herbicides to kill off the fibrous vines before harvesting. After they’re dug up, the potatoes are treated yet again to prevent them from sprouting. Try this experiment: Buy a conventional potato in a store, and try to get it to sprout. It won’t. 81% of potatoes tested still contained pesticides after being washed and peeled, and the potato has one of the highest pesticide contents of 43 fruits and vegetables tested, according to the Environmental Working Group.

3. Peanut butter: More acres are devoted to growing peanuts than any other fruit, vegetable or nut, according to the U.S.D.A. More than 99% of peanut farms use conventional farming practices, including the use of fungicide to treat mold, a common problem in peanut crops. Given that some kids eat peanut butter often, this seems like a simple and practical switch. Commercial food firms now offer organic brands in the regular grocery store. Even opt for grinding your own in store. Kids love the process watching the nut transform into paste!

4. Ketchup: For some families, ketchup accounts for a large part of the household vegetable intake—another sad fact in itself. About 75 percent of tomato consumption is in the form of processed tomatoes, including juice, tomato paste and ketchup. Notably, recent research has shown organic ketchup has about double the antioxidants of conventional ketchup.

5. Apples: Apples are the second most commonly eaten fresh fruit, after bananas. But apples are also one of the most pesticide-contaminated fruits. Why? They are individually grafted (descended from a single tree) so that each variety maintains its distinctive flavor. So apples don’t develop resistance to pests and are sprayed frequently. The industry maintains that these residues are not harmful. Don’t buy that. So minimize exposure by avoiding the most pestiside doused produce but choosing organic apples. The good news is that organic apples are easy to find.

6. Popcorn: Chemicals, like perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), in the lining of the microwave popcorn bags, are part of a class of compounds that may be linked to infertility in humans. Studies show that microwaving causes the chemicals to migrate into your popcorn and accumulate in the body for years. Many manufacturers will phase out PFOA by 2015 under a voluntary EPA plan, but millions of bags of popcorn will be sold between now and then. The solution: Pop organic kernels the old-fashioned way—in a skillet. For flavorings, add real butter, olive oil, or dried seasonings, such as dill, vegetable flakes or nutritional yeast. Bonus is that air-popped popcorn is a whole food, high in nutrients and a way cheaper snack food option.

7. Canned Tomatoes: The resin linings of tin cans contain bisphenol-A, a synthetic estrogen that has been linked to ailments ranging from reproductive problems to heart disease, diabetes and obesity. Unfortunately, acidity—a prominent characteristic of tomatoes—causes BPA to leach into your food. Choose tomatoes in glass bottles (which do not need resin linings). Substitute low sodium organic jarred pasta sauce for canned tomatoes when a recipe calls for canned tomatoes and none are on hand.

8. Meat and Poultry: A study in the journal Meat Science compared the nutritional content of organic and nonorganic chicken meat. The researchers found that the organic samples contained 28% more omega-3s which are linked to reducing rates of heart disease, depression, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, inflammation and Alzheimer’s disease. Animals raised organically are not given antibiotics, growth hormones or feed made from animal by-products (read: they don’t eat their own species).

Money Saving Tricks When Buying Organic

In-Season Savings: Hunt for produce at your local farmer’s markets. Buy organic produce in season (preferably local), when it’s most affordable—usually at half the cost. Not only does your wallet benefit, but also do the local farmers. Produce is farm fresh with a much zingier taste as it was probably just picked that day. Plus, little energy was wasted in its journey from the farm to kitchen.

Buy in Bulk: Organic options can be found at Costco—like organic bagged brown rice, whole-wheat flour and quinoa. Stock up on these, They don’t go bad and you will use them more often when on hand. You can also find many organic grains—brown rice, whole oats, pastas, flours, dried fruits, and nuts in bulk sections of stores for far less.

Portion Control: The recommended portion size for meat and poultry is three ounces, the size of a deck of cards. Stick to this amount and round out your meal with less expensive whole grains and veggies not only to cut meal costs, but also to drastically improve nutritional intake.

Organics to Skip: Which products don’t require the hefty price tag? Step into any health food store and you’ll find an organic version of just about everything, including junk food. While it’s true that organic is still better for you, soda is still soda, even with an organic label. A six-pack of organic soda contains 160 calories and zero nutrients. So skip it entirely. Cutting back on sweets and nutritionally void extras altogether is the best step to better health and won’t sabotage your shopping budget that should be spent on healthy whole foods.  

Alyssa-Schottland Bauman received her training to practice Health Counseling at the Institute for Integrative Nutrition, which is the only nutrition school integrating all the different dietary theories—combining the knowledge of traditional philosophies with modern concepts like the USDA food pyramid, the glycemic index, the Zone and raw foods.  www.nourished.ca

Photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/jdickert/

Jill Amery

Jill Amery is a mom of 2 small boys and the Publisher of UrbanMommies, a stylish digital lifestyle magazine filled with fitness, style, health, recipes and savvy mom advice to help you through pregnancy, birth, and raising your kids.

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Veggie-Sloppy-Joes

Veggie Sloppy Joes

EAT, family meals By October 5, 2013 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , No Comments

Veggie sloppy Joes  are like childhood on a plate. Growing up in the ’70s, you just couldn’t escape this meaty dish. Since it’s such a comfort food, Ceri and I decided to go retro and bring back the sloppy. We’ve updated it, of course, for a more health-conscious family, substituting all that ground beef with a flavor-rich black bean sauce.  This recipe was excerpted from the great new cookbook entitled How to Feed a Family: The Sweet Potatoes Chronicles Cookbook, by Ceri Marsh and Laura Keogh.  As two urban, working moms, Ceri and Laura learned quickly how challenging healthy meal-times can be. So they joined forces to create the Sweet Potato Chronicles (www.sweetpotatochronicles.com), a website written for, and by, non-judgmental moms, packed full of nutritious recipes for families.
This great cookbook is available across Canada at Chapters Indigo


Prep time:   10 minutes
Total time: 35 minutes
Makes:      6 servings

1 Tbsp   (15 ml) olive oil
1 medium onion, diced
5 cup  (125 ml) diced carrots
1 cup  (250 ml) trimmed and diced mushrooms
4 tsp (1 ml) ground cumin
4 tsp (1 ml) paprika
3 cups  (750 ml)  canned  black  beans, drained and rinsed
1 cup  (250 ml) prepared tomato sauce
2 Tbsp (30 ml) red wine vinegar
1 tsp (5 ml) Dijon mustard
1 tsp (5 ml) maple syrup
Salt and pepper
6 whole wheat hamburger buns
5 cup  (125 ml) shredded cheddar or Monterey Jack cheese


Heat the olive oil in a large frying pan over medium heat. Add the onion and carrots and sauté until they begin to soften, about 5 minutes. Now add the mushrooms, cumin and paprika. Stir everything together and allow the mushrooms to soften, 2 to 3 minutes.

Add the beans, tomato sauce, vinegar, mustard and syrup, and allow to simmer and thicken for about 15 minutes. Taste and add salt and pepper if you like.

Toast the hamburger buns (to make those Joes a bit less sloppy). Spoon a generous amount of the bean mixture onto the bottom half of each bun and sprinkle with a good pinch of shredded cheese. Put that hamburger lid on top and serve.

Jill Amery

Jill Amery is a mom of 2 small boys and the Publisher of UrbanMommies, a stylish digital lifestyle magazine filled with fitness, style, health, recipes and savvy mom advice to help you through pregnancy, birth, and raising your kids.

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Risotto, Spinach and Kale Cakes with Parmesan

Risotto, Spinach and Kale Cakes with Parmesan

EAT, family meals By October 5, 2013 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , No Comments

We think these little cakes have everything going for them, from their portable size to their delicious Parmesan flavour. This hearty risotto also gets a dose of my favourite superfood, kale. Two-bite wonders, they’re a great lunch packed up with some fruit and cut vegetables. You can also serve these little bundles alongside eggs at breakfast or as a side with dinner.

This recipe was excerpted from the great new cookbook entitled How to Feed a Family: The Sweet Potatoes Chronicles Cookbook, by Ceri Marsh and Laura Keogh.  As two urban, working moms, Ceri and Laura learned quickly how challenging healthy meal-times can be. So they joined forces to create the Sweet Potato Chronicles (www.sweetpotatochronicles.com), a website written for, and by, non-judgmental moms, packed full of nutritious recipes for families.  The phenomenal cookbook is available across Canada at Chapters Indigo.


Prep time:  30 minutes
Total time: 1 hour
Makes:       about 8

 

5 cup  (125 ml) arborio rice
1 Tbsp   (15 ml) butter
4 cup (60 ml) chopped onion
3 cloves  garlic,  minced
1 cup  (250 ml) chopped kale, fresh or frozen
1 cup  (250 ml) chopped spinach, fresh or frozen
5 cup  (125 ml) grated Parmesan cheese
2 eggs


Preheat the oven to 400°F (200°C). Using a nonstick  spray, grease a muffin  tin.

Cook the arborio rice according to the package directions. If you’re using fresh greens, wash and remove any tough stems then chop. If your greens are frozen, thaw them for a few minutes and squeeze out any liquid.

Meanwhile, in a small frying pan, melt the butter over medium heat. Add the onion  and garlic. Sauté for 2 to 3 minutes, or until the onion is translucent. Add the kale and spinach and sauté for about 5 minutes. Transfer this mixture  to a food processor and pulse until finely chopped.

Transfer to a medium-size bowl and add the rice and cheese. Beat the eggs and then add to the rice. Stir to combine. Pour the mixture into the prepared muffin tin, leaving about 1 inch  (2.5 cm)  space  at the  top. Place in the oven and bake for 18 to 20 minutes, or until  the egg is set and the edges are golden brown.

Allow to cool for a few minutes. Loosen the edges with a knife and turn  the cakes onto  a plate. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator  for up to 4 days.

Jill Amery

Jill Amery is a mom of 2 small boys and the Publisher of UrbanMommies, a stylish digital lifestyle magazine filled with fitness, style, health, recipes and savvy mom advice to help you through pregnancy, birth, and raising your kids.

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Crab tacos

Crab Tacos with Homemade Guacamole

EAT, family meals By September 17, 2013 Tags: , , , , , , , , , 12 Comments

Taco Tuesday? Fajita Friday? Or simply an excuse-for-a-fiesta-Saturday.  All summer long I’ve been tending to the garden as the kids help me water and weed. We’ve tried our hand at growing vegetables and have been thrilled with the results.  In addition, my family and I have the good fortune of owning a crab trap. So when I mastered the summer challenge of catching crab in the Pacific Ocean (though I still won’t touch them), I was very proud.  The only obstacle is when I catch too many.  Seriously.  Listen to myself!  Feeling inspired and using my new pastimes to source fresh ingredients, I got our family and friends out of a serious dinner rut with crab tacos.

Fresh Guacamole and Mexican SaladThe first step was to shell and retrieve meat from (wait for it…) 8 huge crab.  Born and bred in Nova Scotia, I used my lobster-shelling skills and sharp equipment to finish the job.  Gathering tomatoes, jalapeno peppers, onions, garlic and cilantro from the garden, as well as a bag full of lettuce and I was ready.
Salad, Crab Tacos and HOmemade Guacamole (serves 10).

Salad:
Assorted greens
12 sliced roma tomatoes
Purple Onions, diced
1/2 c feta cheese
Dressing: 1/2 cup each olive oil and balsamic, salt and pepper and dijon

Homemade Guacamole:
6 avocados, peeled and pitted
1/2 t cumin
2 cloves garlic (diced)
1/2 t sea salt
4 T lime juice
4 T. sour cream
1/2 c cilantro

Crab:
8 Fresh crab (or 4 tins of store-bought crab)
2 T. butter
1/4 c lemon juice
salt and pepper to taste

Fillings:
6 Jalapenos
2 c. Grated Cheddar Cheese
1 c. Sour Cream
1 c. yellow corn
1 c. red onions
1/2 cu chopped cilantro
Old El Paso salsa

2 Packages Old El Paso soft tortillas

Fresh Crab TacosMethod:

1.  Make the guacamole by combining ingredients listed above. Leaving larger chunks of avocado as you combine with a fork will add texture and interest.
2.  Place diced red onions, corn, salsa, sour cream, cilantro, cheese and jalapenos into dishes.
3.  Heat crab meat in butter in a skillet over low heat. Add salt and pepper and lemon juice at the 2 minute-mark and cook for 1 minute longer.
4.  Warm tortillas in a microwave-safe warmer or in a skillet/oven.  To ensure they remain supple and don’t dry out, you can sprinkle with water.

Arrange all individual ingredients and allow your family to assemble their own tacos according to their liking.  Bon appetit!

Old El Paso wants you to enjoy a Fajita Friday or Taco Tuesday and are providing us with a kit filled with bowls, a cookbook and of course some Old El Paso kits worth $75! Entry is simple, just fill in the Rafflecopter form below. Open to Canadians and the winner will have 48 hours to respond. Giveaway ends September 30th.

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Jill Amery

Jill Amery is a mom of 2 small boys and the Publisher of UrbanMommies, a stylish digital lifestyle magazine filled with fitness, style, health, recipes and savvy mom advice to help you through pregnancy, birth, and raising your kids.

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Mexi Meatless Shepherd’s Pie

EAT, family meals By December 6, 2012 Tags: , , , , , , , No Comments

When the Vegetarian’s Complete Quinoa Cookbook arrived at the UrbanMommies offices we got very excited!  It is often difficult to find great recipes for vegetarians.  This Mexican inspired meatless Shepherd’s Pie is packed with healthy ingredients and huge flavour.

recipe developed by Amy Snider-Whitson, PHEc

2lb (1kg) sweet potatoes, scrubbed well and pierced all over with a fork
1 Tbsp (15 mL) canola oil
1 onion, chopped
1 red pepper, diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tsp (10 mL) ground cumin
1 can (19 oz/540 mL) black beans, no salt added, well rinsed and drained
1 cup (250 mL) cooked quinoa made with water (see pages 5–6)
1 cup (250 mL) frozen corn, no need to thaw
1 cup (250 mL) mild or medium salsa, deli-style
1/4 cup (60 mL) light sour cream
1/4 cup (60 mL) finely chopped cilantro
1/4 tsp (1mL) freshly ground black pepper (optional)
1/4 cup (60 mL) thinly sliced green onion or chopped cilantro for garnish

Method:
Preheat the oven to 350°F (175°C). Bake the sweet potatoes for 60 minutes, or until tender. Alternatively, microwave at high for 8 to 12 minutes. Cool until easy to handle.

Lightly grease an 8­cup (2 L) baking dish with canola oil or line with wet parchment paper (see page 10). Set aside.

In a large soup pot or Dutch oven, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the onion, red pepper, garlic and cumin. Cook, stirring often, for 5 to 7 minutes. Stir in the black beans, cooked quinoa, corn and salsa until well combined. Remove from heat.

Pour into the prepared pan. If you used a microwave to cook the sweet potatoes, at this point preheat the oven to 350°F (175°C).

Meanwhile, cut the cooled sweet potatoes in half and scrape out the flesh. Discard the skins. Mash the sweet potato well with the sour cream. Stir in the cilantro. Season with pepper if desired.

For a rustic look (as in the photo), spoon the sweet potato mixture over the quinoa mixture in heaping teaspoonfuls. (If you like more conformity, spoon on and spread out.)

Bake for 30 minutes, or until heated through and bubbly. Sprinkle top of the casserole with green onion or cilantro (if using) to garnish.

Makes 6 cups (1.5L) • One serving = 1 1/2cups(375mL)

Nutrition per serving (1 1/2 cups/375 mL)

413 calories, 2 mg cholesterol, 13 g fibre, 1 g saturated fat, 75 g carbohydrates, 13 g protein, 6 g total fat, 544 mg sodium, 24 g sugars

Excellent source of vitamins A and C

Jill Amery

Jill Amery is a mom of 2 small boys and the Publisher of UrbanMommies, a stylish digital lifestyle magazine filled with fitness, style, health, recipes and savvy mom advice to help you through pregnancy, birth, and raising your kids.

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