Online Terms for ParentsOur children are growing up in a digital world with technology right at their fingertips. They’re spending more and more time on the web — so teaching them to be safe and responsible online is critical.  During the summer when there is less structure for our children is a critical time to address online safety.  We’ve discovered a list of online terms every parent should know to get your conversations started.

As part of the discussion to educate parents, teachers and children about being responsible and safe online, NBCUniversal’s “The More You Know” Learning Series — in collaboration with NBC News — has unveiled Growing Up Online, a free, interactive eBook on digital literacy and Internet safety.  Even the most experienced Internet user might have a few questions about all the technical language used in the online world. What exactly is a cache? What is your digital footprint?

Here’s a list of commonly used terms:

APP or application, is a software program typically used on a smartphone or mobile device. Apps may feel new, but the phrase “software application” has been around for over thirty years.

Instagram a free photo-sharing and social networking site on which people can take pictures and then share them with other members of the Instagram community.

Social Games games played online in which multiple players in different locations can play together or against one another. These players may or may not know one another online.

Social Networking Sites websites, such as Facebook or Twitter, on which people can share information and photos and play games together.

MMORPG a massive, multiplayer, online role-playing game. “World of Warcraft” is one of the most famous examples.

Digital Footprint the record, or footprint of everywhere you’ve gone online. This may include your visits to a web page or chat room, emails and uploaded videos. Some of this material may be publicly available to anyone searching for it and can be used in ways you might not want it to be.

Cache is a way your computer stores information, from either your own hard disk or online, so that it can be accessed more quickly. There is a record of your computer’s cache, and you can delete items from it if they link to objectionable sites. A related term, browser history, refers to a list of all the sites you’ve visited online in a certain time frame. Each browser lists these differently.

The more you know about how the online world works, the easier it will be to talk with your kids and that’s the best way to keep them safe.

(Adapted from the eBook, Growing Up Online by NBC Universal and NBC News).

To download a free copy of Growing Up Online and learn about digital safety and internet security, visit http://www.themoreyouknow.com/ebooks/ and start a conversation with your kids.

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