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Signs of Implantation - When Pregnancy Begins

Signs of Implantation – When Some Say Pregnancy Begins

baby, FAM, pregnancy By February 11, 2016 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , 114 Comments

Some scientists say that implantation is when and where pregnancy begins. What is implantation and are there any common signs of implantation? Implantation occurs when the egg that has been fertilized by the sperm attaches to the inner wall of the uterus about 7-9 days after conception. Having traveled down the fallopian tube and divided several times, the fertilized zygote has reached its final destination in the warm and nourishing uterine lining. Now it can receive the oxygen and nutrients from mom to begin to grow and develop into the beautiful baby it will become. Implantation must occur for pregnancy to continue.

Jill Amery

Jill Amery is a mom of 2 small boys and the Publisher of UrbanMommies, a stylish digital lifestyle magazine filled with fitness, style, health, recipes and savvy mom advice to help you through pregnancy, birth, and raising your kids.

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pre and post natal side effects

Pre and Post Natal Side Effects

baby, FAM, health By January 2, 2014 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , 1 Comment

So much stuff happens while you’re pregnant and after you give birth, sometimes it feels as though aliens have taken over your body! Listed below are a few common pre and post natal side effects, and foods that help to alleviate the symptoms.

Constipation: this uncomfortable side effect of pregnancy and birth is all too common. Make sure you seek out fiber rich foods and whole grains. Oats also have a mild laxative effect.

Include more quality omega 3 oils to help lubricate the digestive system. Foods like flax, fish, raw nuts and seeds, as well as fiber rich foods, legumes, fruits (such as pears, blueberries, prunes, figs), and veggies like cauliflower. Olives are also known to help stimulate peristalsis and parsnips helps to improve bowel function.

Low energy/fatigue: whether you’re pregnant or a run-off-your feet parent, chances are you’re tired to minimize these effects, be sure you consume complete proteins either from animal products (fish, eggs or a combination of vegetarian sources, like whole grains combined with beans or legumes), ion rich foods including dark green leafy veggies as well as avocados (which are known to prevent anemia) and beets (which act as a blood builder), and complex carbs, and finally whole grains are great too – but make sure to prepare them properly by soaking the grains to eliminate phytic acid, which inhibits nutrient absorption.

Lack of breast milk: quinoa helps stimulate milk flow, as well as dark green leafy vegetables. Avoid sage, as it slows down milk production.

Postpartum depression: fluctuating hormones and lack of sleep can cause a roller coaster of emotions that all mothers can relate to, but sometimes these lows can be longer lasting and more intense then the regular ‘baby blues’. It’s always important to talk to your doctor if you suspect you may be experiencing post partum depression. It is also known that increasing foods high in omega 3 fatty acids, such as nuts, seeds, fish (mackerel) also helps to balance hormones. Increase intake of foods containing B vitamins like nutritional yeast, eggs, whole grains and green leafy vegetables. Foods with slow release sugars such as whole grains, legumes and starchy vegetables will help ensure that your sugar levels are not constantly peaking and crashing.

Morning sickness: who ever named it ‘morning sickness’ clearly was never pregnant. For many people, ginger can alleviate the symptoms, it may also help to increase vitamin B6 rich foods – such as millet, buckwheat and oats.

Tissue healing: omega 3 rich foods (salmon, walnuts and flax seeds) which are anti-inflammatory can help with tissue healing after giving birth. It’s best to avoid the night shade family (peppers, eggplants, tomatoes, potatoes etc.) which are pro-inflammatory. Also do your best to include more antioxidant rich foods (cruciferous vegetables like broccoli, cauliflower etc., whole grains, berries etc.) in your diet.

Colicky baby: when you’re breastfeeding, the foods you consume go right through to your breast milk and can affect your baby. Avoid gas-promoting foods like garlic, onions, beans, legumes, and vegetables from the cruciferous broccoli, cauliflower family. Brown rice helps with colic when given to both baby (as rice water) and mother.

Heartburn: this is a common affliction amongst pregnant ladies, even those who had not experienced it before. Try to increase consumption of complex carbs, which are less likely to increase acidity. Heartburn is caused when stomach acid is washed back into the esophagus. eat foods like broccoli, brown rice, winter squash, and potatoes. Also include foods rich in vitamin B5, which helps break down fats, carbs and proteins, and helps to convert them into useable compounds. Examples of vitamin B5 rich foods include avocados, yogurt, sunflower seeds, salmon & mushrooms. Digestive enzymes can also be quite helpful, both papaya and pineapple are full of enzymes which will help aide digestion. Be sure to eat small meals throughout the day and be sure to chew thoroughly.

photo: tipstimes.com/pregnancy

Jill Amery

Jill Amery is a mom of 2 small boys and the Publisher of UrbanMommies, a stylish digital lifestyle magazine filled with fitness, style, health, recipes and savvy mom advice to help you through pregnancy, birth, and raising your kids.

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am i getting my period or am i pregnant?

Am I Getting My Period or Could I Be Pregnant?

FAM, LIVE, nourish, pregnancy By June 5, 2013 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , No Comments

It can sometimes be difficult to tell your period apart from early pregnancy signs. I remember with both pregnancies asking myself “am I getting my period or could I be pregnant?” A lot of women confuse the symptoms with each other. Some of the early signs of pregnancy include: fatigue, nausea, vomiting, shortness of breath, sore breasts, and headaches. These are just a few of the early pregnancy symptoms. However each woman is different and the pregnancy symptoms may vary.

Early pregnancy symptoms are also similar to those of side effects of getting your period. But how do you tell if you’re pregnant and it’s not just your period? If your period is a few days late I wouldn’t get too worried just yet. While your period can be on time for many years, it can also regulate now and then. If your period is 7 or more days late, you can always try a pregnancy test. It’s usually difficult to even catch a pregnancy with a test at the very early weeks, so if it’s negative your first time and your period still hasn’t come, I would wait a week or so then try the test again. Cramping, hot flashes, headaches, and light spotting can very well just be your period.

Some pregnant women do notice a little light spotting around the time of their period, however you can also experience light spotting during the time of your period even when you are not pregnant. If you have more than a few of these symptoms, I would take a pregnancy test right away.

– Sore breasts
– Fatigue
– Nausea
– Lack of energy
– 5-7 days or later period
– Backaches
– Cramping
– Cravings or food aversions
– Mood swings
– Bloating
– Elevated body temperature
– Sensitivity to smells
– Dizziness or fainting

All of these signs can point to pregnancy.  (We also have some ‘Very Early Pregnancy Signs‘ if you are interested).  If you feel other symptoms such as pelvic or abdominal pain, or lightheadedness, call your practitioner immediately. These can be signs of ectopic pregnancy.

Jill Amery

Jill Amery is a mom of 2 small boys and the Publisher of UrbanMommies, a stylish digital lifestyle magazine filled with fitness, style, health, recipes and savvy mom advice to help you through pregnancy, birth, and raising your kids.

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partner-help-during-labor

How Can Your Partner Help During Early Labour?

FAM, pregnancy By August 10, 2009 Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , No Comments

SO many spouses and helpers ask how they can help during early labour. Often the pregnant woman gets irritated if her partner doesn’t know exactly what to do, and everyone ends up frustrated and stressed – which doesn’t help the birth process. Early labour is usually the longest phase of labour.

What’s happening in early labour?
– The cervix softens (ripens), begins thinning (effacing) and dilates to 3 cm.
– You may have show.
– 10-12% of women have their bags of water break at the beginning of labour
– Soft bowel movements increase

Often contractions are sporadic at the beginning of labour. Gradually they develop into a rhythm becoming longer, stronger, and closer together. Often they are quite short at the beginning (15 to 20 seconds) and they become longer as the labour progresses. The contractions begin, peak and end. They come like waves. The pain ebbs and flops with the contractions.

Jill Amery

Jill Amery is a mom of 2 small boys and the Publisher of UrbanMommies, a stylish digital lifestyle magazine filled with fitness, style, health, recipes and savvy mom advice to help you through pregnancy, birth, and raising your kids.

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Your Thyroid Could Be Making You Tired

Uncategorized By September 1, 2007 Tags: , , , No Comments

Your Thyroid Could Be Making You TiredFatigue is a common complaint in a physician’s office.  Many people are feeling run down and tired.  They don’t wake up rested and have a lack of energy in completing daily tasks of life. Naturopathic medicine aims to find the cause of fatigue.  Although there are many reasons for fatigue ranging from insomnia to vitamin and mineral deficiencies, under active thyroid function – or hypothyroidism – is often a part of the problem. Your thyroid could be making you tired.

Jill Amery

Jill Amery is a mom of 2 small boys and the Publisher of UrbanMommies, a stylish digital lifestyle magazine filled with fitness, style, health, recipes and savvy mom advice to help you through pregnancy, birth, and raising your kids.

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