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Education

Waldorf schooling for your child

Waldorf schooling for your child

grow, LIVE By January 31, 2011 Tags: , , , 2 Comments

Waldorf schooling for your child emphasizes the role of the imagination in learning, developing thinking that includes a creative as well as an analytic component. Studies of the education describe its overarching goal as providing young people the basis on which to develop into free, moral and integrated individuals, and to help every child fulfill his or her unique destiny

Jill Amery

Jill Amery is a mom of 2 small boys and the Publisher of UrbanMommies, a stylish digital lifestyle magazine filled with fitness, style, health, recipes and savvy mom advice to help you through pregnancy, birth, and raising your kids.

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Google for Kids

apps, GEAR By September 13, 2010 Tags: , , No Comments

Do your kids beg to use the computer and you rack your brain trying to find educational opportunities instead of games?  With a few tips from Google you can keep your kids busy and stimulated. Check out the following list of online activities kids can do using free web tools to explore the world, travel through time, and use their imaginations.

Jill Amery

Jill Amery is a mom of 2 small boys and the Publisher of UrbanMommies, a stylish digital lifestyle magazine filled with fitness, style, health, recipes and savvy mom advice to help you through pregnancy, birth, and raising your kids.

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montessori

Montessori method of schooling

FAM, kids By July 8, 2008 Tags: , , , , , 8 Comments

The Montessori method is an educational method for children, based on theories of child development originated by Italian educator Maria Montessori in the late 19th and early 20th century. It is applied primarily in preschool and elementary school settings, though some Montessori high schools exist.

Jill Amery

Jill Amery is a mom of 2 small boys and the Publisher of UrbanMommies, a stylish digital lifestyle magazine filled with fitness, style, health, recipes and savvy mom advice to help you through pregnancy, birth, and raising your kids.

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Top Ten Parenting Tips

Uncategorized By August 20, 2007 Tags: , , , , No Comments

family.jpgRaising children can be the most rewarding experience on earth.

Jill Amery

Jill Amery is a mom of 2 small boys and the Publisher of UrbanMommies, a stylish digital lifestyle magazine filled with fitness, style, health, recipes and savvy mom advice to help you through pregnancy, birth, and raising your kids.

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Saving for Your Child’s Education

Uncategorized By October 1, 2006 Tags: , , , No Comments

Most people say RESPs are the way to go in terms of saving for your child’s education, but that’s not necessarily the case.  In fact, there are many different ways to save for your child’s education and RESPs are just one of the vehicles.  My answer to the question is always, “It depends.”  It depends on how much money you want to put away, what expenses you currently have, how much free cash you have on a monthly basis, what tax bracket you’re in … and the list goes on.  Here are some options for you to save money for your child’s education:

(1)  Registered Education Savings Plans: RESPs are a great way to save for your child’s education.  You get a grant from the government (anywhere from 20% up to 40% depending on your tax bracket) that automatically adds to your contributions and you also get tax deferred growth.  Plus, when your children go to school, they’re the ones getting
taxed – at a much lower rate than you would.   Make sure that you pick a personal RESP.  This allows you to control the money and how it gets invested, plus you can stop and start your contributions along the way without being penalized.

(2)  Making contributions to a spousal RRSP: If you stay at home and look after the kids, your spouse can make contributions in your name.  This could result in an even higher return on your taxes than the grant money you would get from the government.  When it comes time for the kids to go to school, you could withdraw the money in your name at a lower tax bracket.  Plus, if they didn’t go to school, you wouldn’t lose the tax credit that you got along the way, unlike RESPs, which require you to return all of the grant money if your child doesn’t go to a qualifying institution.

(3)  Life Insurance policy for your child: Universal Life policies have an insurance component and an investment component to them.  Not only is your child covered in the event of a tragedy, you have access to the money that builds up in these policies (tax deferred) for anything you want – not just education.  In addition, you can ensure that your child can get up to $900,000 more insurance coverage over their lifetime.

(4)  Invest in your child’s name: If you put money into your child’s name and the investment generates capital gains, the income is attributed to your child.  (Dividends and income come back to you.)   This money would be taxed yearly, but at a minimal rate at most.  This allows you to have money that is free of any “government strings” requiring your child to go to a specific institution.  Plus, it can be used at any time, without worry of tax implications.   Buy a car for a 16th birthday, go on a trip to Disneyland, pay for braces, whatever you like.

(5)  Savings account: Get your child saving money for his own education.  It will let them feel a part of the process and get them started on developing good financial habits.

There are many different ways that you can save for your child’s education.
What’s best for you?  That depends.

– Ryan Douglas CFP.

 

Jill Amery

Jill Amery is a mom of 2 small boys and the Publisher of UrbanMommies, a stylish digital lifestyle magazine filled with fitness, style, health, recipes and savvy mom advice to help you through pregnancy, birth, and raising your kids.

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Working Together as Parents

Uncategorized By August 30, 2006 Tags: , , , , , 1 Comment

Working Together A Different Co.Remember when mom took care of the house and dad went off to work? If you were like me, that was the context in which growing up occurred. My mom was amazing. She baked fresh bread every week and for dinner we always had a homemade dessert. She kept her house clean and her children safe and held her marriage together with patience, persistence, tolerance and love. Dad was amazing too. Every day he would go to work long hours in his construction trade and was home to eat dinner with the family. On weekends he would take us fishing or hiking or we would build things in his workshop.

Mom wasn’t the Mrs. Cleaver of homemaking though. She was a strong willed, outspoken lady (still is) who did what she wanted, bought what she wanted and cursed every now and again (though only when she thought us kids were out of earshot). Dad went on his hunting and fishing trips without the family; he was not into sharing his feelings, and he was known to have a few drinks now and again.

When I was kid and the youngest of five children, I knew that my parents had it figured out (except, of course, when I was in my teen years, when I was pretty clear they knew nothing). Sure, there was trial and tribulation, they argued, they made mistakes but they provided for us, nurtured us, helped us learn, comforted us and made our home a safe and happy place. I can’t remember a time when I didn’t feel my parent’s love for me.

As I got older, I realized that my situation wasn’t necessarily common – not all my friends had the luxury of parents who were still married. I also realize that there is little reality in the whole concept of“Doing it Right”. As a parent I have conversations with Mom and Dad about doing our best to raise our children (they are still doing it). They admit that they are guessing and exploring, much like I do as a mother of three, on a daily basis, hoping that it in the end, all will turn out well.And it has. Here I am, the youngest of five children with children of my own.

So what did Mom and Dad do? What made it work? How can I be a great parent? What can we as parents do so that our children, years from now, speak of us with the reverence that I speak of my own parents?

To pinpoint one thing that Mom and Dad “Did the Right Way”, it is the love they create in their home. And again, I am not talking about Leave – it – to – Beaver – Cookie – Cutter – Perfect love. When they argued you could hear them clear across the neighborhood and sometimes there was dinner thrown across the kitchen and bottles smashed. We shed tears, but we always knew there was love. Mom and Dad loved each other. Growing up I witnessed their relationship evolve and grow and mature and endure. This gave me a model of what a relationship can be and set the standard for my own relationships. Even when they didn’t like each other, they loved each other. And that made them successful parents. They worked together as a team. They are still doing it.

Working together is such a simple and brilliant concept – one that is often forgotten in the day to day of parenthood. What can parents do to work together to cope with changes and challenges? We can work together. Avoid isolating yourself as a parent and our children will know that they are not alone. Working together, creating teams and support structures, asking for help and sharing will have us succeed as parents.

Tania Burgi is the mother of three and a visionary. She is the co-founder of Different and a professional performance coach. Together with her team, Tania is out to challenge the norm and leave people inspired. Visit www.adifferentcompany.com to see how.

Jill Amery

Jill Amery is a mom of 2 small boys and the Publisher of UrbanMommies, a stylish digital lifestyle magazine filled with fitness, style, health, recipes and savvy mom advice to help you through pregnancy, birth, and raising your kids.

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